What is PBSP and How Can It Help with PTSD?

There are many different ways to approach healing PTSD, but one of the commonalities about many of these different approaches is that they focus on the not just the mind, but also the body. The Pesso Boyden System Psychomotor (PBSP) approach is yet another one of them that does this. PBSP was created by Albert Pesso and Diane Boyden, two people who were professional dancers. They noticed that when they asked their dancers to try to express their emotions through physical movements, the dancers felt much better and relieved afterward.

 

Maybe we just have to let all of our emotions out of our system after all. The mind and body are more closely related than most of us realize, and there are many different ways to get your emotions out. Some of us feel better after simply talking or writing them out. Others might get relief from going for a run, punching a bag, doing yoga, or dancing around a room.

 

Sometimes though, none of that is good enough, and you might actually need to act out the scenario that is bothering you. The theory behind this approach is that the reason your memories keep haunting you is that you were never able to see the result or end. So what PBSP does is gives you an outlet where you can reenact all the potential scenarios of that past memory in a group acting setting. This can hopefully allow you to make peace with your traumatic experience and be able to move on from it.

 

Dancing and acting might not be able to solve all of your problems, but it can be a good mood booster and a fun place to start.

Sensorimotor Psychotherapy – Another Option for PTSD Healing

In one of the previous blogs, we talked about Somatic Experiencing (SE), where the focus is on what the physical body goes through after trauma. Sensorimotor Psychotherapy is very similar to that as well. Sensorimotor functioning has to do with your senses and motor skills in your surrounding environment. When you have PTSD, your mind and body can react differently to certain sights, smells, sounds, tastes, and physical sensations. Sometimes this means that your body kicks into fight or flight mode, and other times you simply shut down and begin dissociating from everything and everyone around you. This can then really begin to mess with your head, making your thoughts turn foggy and erratic. Your emotions can become a complete mess too, and before you know it, you’re spiraling down into a horrendous panic episode.

 

The idea behind Sensorimotor Psychotherapy is to bring your physical body’s responses in line with your mental state so that instead of feeding off of each other and bringing on more panic, they mitigate each other and bring you to a place of ease, where you can appropriately deal with what’s in front of you and eventually and completely overcome your trauma once and for all.

 

Our thoughts hold a lot of power over us. If you think you can’t do something, then you won’t. If you don’t feel like you’re good enough, then you aren’t. It’s the same thing when it comes to your physical body. If you think you’re afraid, then your body is going to act like it is afraid. If you think you are helpless, then your body will act in this way too. Sensorimotor Psychotherapy will help you to recognize your negative and obtrusive thoughts so that you can stop allowing them to rule your life.

 

Positive thinking can go a long way in healing PTSD, and Sensorimotor Psychotherapy can help you to recognize your negative thoughts and turn them into positive ones. This is a great method for processing traumatic memories so you can learn to overcome them. This form of therapy was developed by Dr. Pat Ogden in the 1970s. She says that this approach uses a combination of strategies to help you heal, including neuroscience, the attachment theory, somatic and cognitive approaches, and what is known as the Hakomi Method.

 

The Hakomi Method is a form of therapy that focuses on mindfulness, loving-kindness, and empathy. These are things that everyone could benefit from, but especially those that are suffering from PTSD.

 

If you’d like to know more about the Sensorimotor Psychotherapy approach, Dr. Pat Ogden published a book on it that’s titled Sensorimotor Psychotherapy: Interventions for Trauma and Attachment. In it, it goes into detail about how and why it works. If you are unsure as to where to turn to next for getting your PTSD under control, you should check this out. Sensorimotor Psychotherapy just might be the best option for you.